The May issue of Hakin9 Magazine is out!

hakin9 May 2014The may issue of Hakin9 Magazine is out!

This month’s magazine includes my article, “Detecting and Exploiting the OpenSSL-Heartbleed Vulnerability”:

“In this article we will discuss how to detect systems that are vulnerable to the OpenSSL-Heartbleed vulnerability and learn how to exploit them using Metasploit on Kali Linux.”

It is a step-by-step tutorial that shows how to detect systems that are vulnerable to the Heartbleed exploit in your organization and also shows how to exploit the bug.

Check out the intro to the article here.

Also in this issue:

What is Reverse Engineering

by Aman Singh

Reverse engineering as this article will discuss it is simply the act of figuring out what software that you have no source code for does in a particular feature or function to the degree that you can either modify this code, or reproduce it in another independent work.

Write Your Own Debugger

by Amr Thabet

Do you want to write your own debugger? Do you have a new technology and see the already known products like OllyDbg or IDA Pro don’t have this technology? … Do you write plugins in OllyDbg and IDA Pro but you need to convert it into a separate application? …

The Logic Breaks Logic

by Raheel Ahmad

People – Process – Technology, your Internet industry is based on these three words as a base of everything including the software market. Think for a second and you will realize that the Software industry is actually driven from the keyboard of a programmer and in reality it’s the logic design by the programmer.

Playing with the Ports Redirection 49

by Davide Peruzzi

Whether you are performing a penetration test or that your goal is to debug an error in your complicated corporate network or, why not, to bypass control of a very restrictive firewall that does not allows to display web pages categorized as “hacking”, the port redirection is a technique as basic as it is powerful.

And much more, check it out!

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Hakin9 Exploiting Software September Issue is out!

Another excellent issue of Hakin9 Exploiting Software is here!

Check out these exciting articles:

Windows 8 Security in Action
By Daniel Dieterle

In this issue I wrote the article “Windows 8 Security in Action” which gives a short look at the new Windows 8 look for those who haven’t seen it yet and then delve into its updated security features and lingering security issues from previous versions of Windows:

Is Windows 8 the next operating system for your enterprise? In this article, we will take a quick look at Microsoft’s new OS – Windows 8. We will see some of the new security features that make it more secure than its predecessor Windows 7. We will also run the security through the paces and see some of the possible issues that are new to the OS and some that have carried over from previous versions of Windows. From the Backtrack 5 r3 security testing platform, the author uses the Metasploit Framework and Social Engineering Toolkit to see how Windows 8 stands up to the most common internet based threats.

Raspberry Pi Hacking
By Jeremiah Brott

Follow this guide at your own risk. I take no responsibility for any outcome from anything you attempt to do within this guide – says the author. The Raspberry Pi is a credit-card sized computer that plugs into your TV and a keyboard. It’s a capable little PC which can be used for many of the things that your desktop PC does, like spreadsheets, word-processing and games. It also plays high-definition video. We want to see it being used by kids all over the world to learn programming. If you love your Pi you’ll definitely love to hack it.

Malware, Botnet and cyber threats, what is happening to the cyberspace?
By Pierluigi Paganini

The article proposes an analysis of the main cyber threats that worry security experts and that are profoundly changing the cyber space. The exponential growth of the number of cyber threats and attacks is rebutted by a wide range of statistical provided by reports published by the major security firms. The scenario is really scaring due concomitant action of cybercriminals, hacktivists and state sponsored hackers that are producing malware and botnets of increasing complexity.

Live Capture Procedures
By Craig Wright

Live data capture is an essential skill in required for both Incident Handlers as well as Forensic
practitioners and it is one that is becoming more, not less, important over time as we move towards networked and cloud based systems. This article has introduced a few tools that, although free, can be used together to create a powerful network forensics and incident response toolkit. Like all of these tools, the secret comes to practice.

  • SQL Injection By Wong Chon Kit
  • Network Pen Testing Breaking the Corporate Network through Hackers Perspective By Amar Wakharkar
  • Intel SMEP overview and bypass on Windows 8 By Artem Shikhin
  • Android Application Assessment By Nilesh Kumar

Check it out!

Hakin9 Exploiting Software July 2012 Issue is out!

Pentesting with Android – new Exploiting Software Hakin9 issue is out!

Are you curious how to turn your Wi-Fi smart phone or tablet into a pentesting tool? Check out the new issue of Exploiting Software Hakin9!

WHAT’S IN THIS ISSUE?

•    Searching For Exploits, SCAPY Fuzzing
•    Weak Wi-Fi Security, Evil Hotspots & Pentesting with Android
•    An In-Depth Analysis on Targeted Attacks
•    Automated security audit of a web application
•    Reverse Engineer Obfuscated
•    Cross Site Scripting(XSS)
•    Implementing Rsylog to forward log messages
•    They Are Offline But I Exploited Them

 

Weak Wi-Fi Security, Evil Hotspots and Pentesting with Android
By Dan Dieterle

Wireless networks and mobile Wi-Fi devices have saturated both the home front and business arena. The threats against Wi-Fi networks have been known for years, and though some effort has been made to lock down wireless networks, many are still wide open. In this article we will look at a few common Wi-Fi security misconceptions. We will also see how a penetration tester (or unfortunately, hackers) could set up a fake Access Point (AP) using a simple wireless card and redirect network users, capture authentication credentials and possibly gain full remote access to the client.

Finally we will look at the latest app for Android that allows you to turn your Wi-Fi smart phone or tablet into a pentesting tool. With it you can scan your network for open ports, check for vulnerabilities, perform exploits, Man-in-the-Middle (MitM) attacks and even sniff network traffic on both your Wi-Fi network and wired LAN.

Searching For Exploits, SCAPY Fuzzing
By Craig Wright

SCAPY is a series of python based scripts that are designed for network level packet manipulation. With it, we can sniff network traffic, interactively manipulate it, and fuzz services. More, SCAPY decodes the packets that it receives without interpreting them. The article is going into some of the fundamentals that you will need in order to understand the shellcode and exploit creation process, how to use Python as a launch platform for your shellcode and what the various system components are.

And much more…

For additional article information click here or…

Hakin9 Exploiting Software, May Issue – Buffer Overflow

Hakin9 IT Security Magazine has just released it’s May issue of Exploiting Software “Buffer Overflow“.

This month’s magazine features the article “Recovering Passwords and Encrypted Data Remotely in Plain Text” written by yours truly. In this article, I talk about recovering remote Windows passwords in plain text using both Mimikatz and WCE.

I also talk about the dangers that online attacks can present to file encryption. I show how a Java based online attack can easily bypass and recover encrypted files without encryption. Even thought a file was protected by whole disk encryption and the file itself was encrypted by a separate program, I was easily able to remotely read and download the file with no problems.

Craig Wright also continues his excellent series with an article on Extending Control, API Hooking. API hooking the malicious code is used to vary the library function calls and returns by replacing the valid function calls with one of the attackers choosing. The article follows from previous articles as well as goes into some of the fundamentals that you will need in order to understand the shellcode creation process, how to use Python as a launch platform for your shellcode and that the various system components are.

This article includes a section on functions and calls, extending DLL injection and then move to the actual API hooking process (that we will extend) in coming articles. With these skills you will have the foundations for creating shellcode for exploits and hence an understanding of the process that penetration testers and hackers use in exploiting systems. You will see how it is possible to either create your own exploit code from scratch or even to modify existing exploit code to either add functionality or in order to bypass signature based IDS/IPS filters

Also in this issue:

  • The Basics Of Buffer Overflow, Fuzzing and Exploitation By Richer Dinelle
  • Exploit a Software with Buffer Overflow Vulnerability and Bypassing ASLR Protection By Ahmed Sherif El-Demrdash
  • Danger of Man in the Middle Attacks to Modern Life By Wong Chon Kit
  • E-mail Spam Filtering and Natural Language Processing By Yufan Guo
  • Security Communication and Why You Should Trundle By Dean Bushmiller
  • Overriding Function Calls in Linux By Umair Manzoor

Check it out!