Hakin9: Exploiting Software Bible now Available

Exploiting Software Bible

Now Available Single Issue – Only $36.90 for our 200 + pages best of Exploiting Software

The Bible Includes:

·  Shellcode:
Exploiting Format Strings with Python

·  Reverse Engineering:
Reversing EXE with OllyDbg

·  Buffer Overflow: Smashing the Stack

·  Exploiting Client Software:
Hijacking Software Updates with Evilgrade

·  Defense Pattern:
Easy Network Security Monitoring with Security Onion

And much more inside

Get Hakin9’s single issue for only $36.90 or an annual subscription for only $221.40 (USD)

Learn best software exploiting and protection techniques!

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Hakin9 Exploiting Software, May Issue – Buffer Overflow

Hakin9 IT Security Magazine has just released it’s May issue of Exploiting Software “Buffer Overflow“.

This month’s magazine features the article “Recovering Passwords and Encrypted Data Remotely in Plain Text” written by yours truly. In this article, I talk about recovering remote Windows passwords in plain text using both Mimikatz and WCE.

I also talk about the dangers that online attacks can present to file encryption. I show how a Java based online attack can easily bypass and recover encrypted files without encryption. Even thought a file was protected by whole disk encryption and the file itself was encrypted by a separate program, I was easily able to remotely read and download the file with no problems.

Craig Wright also continues his excellent series with an article on Extending Control, API Hooking. API hooking the malicious code is used to vary the library function calls and returns by replacing the valid function calls with one of the attackers choosing. The article follows from previous articles as well as goes into some of the fundamentals that you will need in order to understand the shellcode creation process, how to use Python as a launch platform for your shellcode and that the various system components are.

This article includes a section on functions and calls, extending DLL injection and then move to the actual API hooking process (that we will extend) in coming articles. With these skills you will have the foundations for creating shellcode for exploits and hence an understanding of the process that penetration testers and hackers use in exploiting systems. You will see how it is possible to either create your own exploit code from scratch or even to modify existing exploit code to either add functionality or in order to bypass signature based IDS/IPS filters

Also in this issue:

  • The Basics Of Buffer Overflow, Fuzzing and Exploitation By Richer Dinelle
  • Exploit a Software with Buffer Overflow Vulnerability and Bypassing ASLR Protection By Ahmed Sherif El-Demrdash
  • Danger of Man in the Middle Attacks to Modern Life By Wong Chon Kit
  • E-mail Spam Filtering and Natural Language Processing By Yufan Guo
  • Security Communication and Why You Should Trundle By Dean Bushmiller
  • Overriding Function Calls in Linux By Umair Manzoor

Check it out!

Hakin9 Magazine Features “Pulling Passwords from Memory Dump” Article

Hakin9 is well known in the security circles and is just a great magazine. It is known as “A magazine for IT security professionals by IT security professionals”. It covers some of the latest information on attack and defense tactics that are out there.

For those of you who are not familiar with Hakin9, the Worldwide IT Security magazine started in 2005 and is released 4 times a month:

  • Hakin9 (release date:1stof each month) – 50 pages of content dedicated to IT security, few regular columns written by specialists
  • Hakin9 Mobile (release date: 7th of each month) – 40 pages of content devoted to hacking and security of mobile devices and applications
  • Hakin9 Extra (release date: 15thof each month) – 50 pages of strictly topical content dedicated each time to different hot security topic
  • Exploiting Software (release date: 22nd of each month) – 40 pages of content dedicated to latest software exploits and security

This months Exploiting Software magazine has some interesting articles including:

Starting to Write Your Own Linux Schellcode
Buffer Overflow Exploitation A to Z
Anatomy of the Black Hole Exploit Kit
Hacking Applets: A Reverse Engineering Approach
The Gentoo Hardened Project: Or How to Minimize Exploits Risks

And, forgive me for some shameless self promotion, How to Recover Passwords from a Memory Dump.

How to Recover Passwords from a Memory Dump

Malware analysis is an amazing field. To be able to grab a memory dump from a live machine and then have the capabilities to pull useful information from it just amazes the author. Can we find pertinent system settings, and even pull information from them? Were you ever curious about what could be done with a memory dump of an active computer? This article is a short demonstration on how to acquire a memory dump from a running system, and then how to use tools to not only recover the system password hashes from the memory dump, but also how to decode them.

The Hakin9 article I wrote is based on the memory forensics topics & hash cracking posts that have been covered recently here on CyberArms. I am pretty excited about it, and hope you like it too.

Check it out!