Basic Security Testing with Kali Linux Giveaway Contest

Want a chance to get a signed copy of my latest Kali Linux book? I am giving away a total of 10 signed copies of “Basic Security Testing with Kali Linux, 3rd Edition”!

Simply follow, like and share this article, or my official Twitter or Instagram announcement, for a chance to win a signed copy of my new book!

10 lucky winners will be randomly selected on October 31st.

The Contest is for those living in the United States only. I may do another one for international readers in the future.

Liking this article & sharing the Official Contest announcements on Twitter and Instagram will increase your chances of winning.  Winners will be notified on October 31st. If a winner cannot be notified or does not respond by the end of the first week of November, another winner will be picked.

Good luck!

 

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New Book Overview: “Basic Security Testing with Kali Linux, 3rd Edition”

My newest book, a cover to cover update of my Basic Kali book is now available! After numerous requests for an update, the new “Basic Security Testing with Kali Linux, 3rd Edition” is here!

What was intended to be a quick version change update, turned into a 6-month overhaul. It is amazing how much can change in the security world in 2 years. All chapters have been revamped, with a lot of new material added. The latest book is also 50 pages longer than the previous version!

What’s New:

  • The entire book was updated to Kali Linux 2018
  • All tools & tutorials updated
  • Obsolete tools removed
  • Many new tools added
  • Password Cracking section expanded
  • Kali on RPi chapter totally revamped
  • Kali NetHunter chapter added

Table of Contents List:

I was going to use Metasploitable3 for the Windows target in this book, but with the install complexity (and install issues) of Ms3, I decided to stay with Windows 7. I also occasionally use Windows 10 as a test target and Server 2016 is mentioned a few times as well. I will most likely use Ms3 for the upcoming advanced book. Metasploitable2 is still used for some of the Linux tutorials, as it is very easy for new users to use and follow.

The Basic Kali book is used by Universities, Training Centers, and in Ethical Hacking classes worldwide. It is also used as a training aid for multiple US Government Agencies. I have also been told numerous times that my Kali series is excellent prep material for the OSCP certification. The book is now in its third revision, with major changes made from user feedback and requests.

I have been completely shocked and humbled by the popularity of a book that was originally written as an extension of my blog posts and has evolved into a worldwide basic training guide for the exceptional Kali Linux ethical hacking platform. This continuing project would have never been possible without the flood of support and feedback from the infosec community. I am very excited to present this new version to the community and look forward to hearing your feedback and comments.

Check it out on Amazon.com.

Thank you so much for your continued support!

NetHunter Article Featured in Hakin9 Magazine

The latest Hakin9 Magazine is out! This issue is all about Android security and features my article on using Kali NetHunter and Responder together for getting quick user credentials.

Front Cover

In my article I explain how you could recover network credentials from a Windows network using the Android based Kali NetHunter and Responder (an LLMNR, NBT-NS & MDNS poisoner). I also show how you can “pass the hash” with credentials obtained and gain remote shell access to an unsecured or improperly secured Windows Server.

Other Articles in this Issue Include:

Mobile Penetration Testing Tutorial

by Olivia Orr

The objective of this tutorial is to learn the most common vulnerabilities in mobile applications using an app intentionally designed to be insecure. This tutorial will be based on the Windows platform, but you can use other systems if you wish.


Quick Android Review Kit (QARK) – A comrade for Android security analysis

by Vinayak Joshi and Venkatesh Sivakumar (Pranav Venkat)

QARK stands for Quick Android Review Kit. A quirky companion to get the hidden potential vulnerabilities of any Android applications. It is an open community tool designed to assist mobile application security pentesters to leverage its capabilities to reverse engineer mobile applications and conduct static analysis on the hidden vulnerabilities that can potentially create critical breaches. This article will explain how to use it.


Peeping Inside Android Applications: Reverse Engineering with Androguard

by Ajit Kumar

Reverse engineering is one of the ways to find out what’s inside of any Android applications; it also helps developers to learn, test and debug their and applications as well as applications written by others. Reverse engineering is a complex and cumbersome task, so tools like Androguard make this task automated and hence ease the job of reverse engineers. This tutorial provides a brief introduction of Androguard, explains various tools available inside Androguard and provides some examples of basic reverse engineering with Androguard.

And much more, check it out!

Creating Hashcat Keymap Walking Password Wordlists

Hashcat’s latest keymap walking tool, “KwProcessor”, quickly and easily generates password lists based on keymap walking techniques. In this article, the first of several password cracking themed articles, we will take a quick look at how to use this tool.

Introduction

Keymap walking passwords are popular amongst many organizations as they are pretty easy to use and remember. Basically, you start with a specific key on the keyboard and then pick a direction (or multiple directions) and start hitting keys. Your password is entered as you “walk” across the keyboard.

You can create a complex password in this manner by using the shift key and including numbers in the pattern, as seen below:

 hashcat_wordlist

Starting with the letter “z”, we move North West, hitting the “a”,”q”, and “1” keys. We then move East a row, hitting the number “2”, and then move South East back down the keyboard hitting the “w” key and stopping on “s”.

This would create the password, “zaq12ws”. If we alternately used the shift key, we would get the password, “ZaQ1@wS” which is a little more complex.

What makes keymap walking so successful (until now) is that an attacker would need to know the starting key, direction, direction changes, if any special key is used and when, and of course the ending key.  Hashcat’s new KwProcessor tool makes creating keymap walking wordlists very easy to do.

Installing KwProcessor (kwp)

We will be using Kali Linux as the operating system. At the time of this writing kwp is not installed by default. So, we will need to download and install it.

From a Kali Terminal prompt:

As seen below:

hashcat_keymap_walking2

You can type, “./kwp -V” to check that it installed correctly and display the software version.

Keymaps and Routes

To crack keymap walking passwords you will need two things, a layout of the keyboard keys and a list of routes to take to create the wordlists. In the kwp program directory you will find the “keymaps” and “routes” folders:

hashcat_keymap_walking3

The Keymaps folder contains the keyboard layout for multiple languages:

hashcat_keymap_walking4

The routes folder has 7 preconfigured keymap walks or routes that can be used to generate passwords:

hashcat_keymap_walking5

We can use these preconfigured routes or create our own using command line switches.

Type, “./kwp –help” to see the available options:

hashcat_keymap_walking6

Creating a KWP Wordlist

To create a simple kwp wordlist, we will use the English keymap and the 2-10 max 3 directional change route file. This can be accomplished by running the command below:

./kwp basechars/full.base keymaps/en.keymap routes/2-to-10-max-3-direction-changes.route

This causes kwp to create multiple keymap walk combinations, of 2-11 characters with a maximum of 3 direction changes:

hashcat_keymap_walking7

The output of the command is sent directly to the screen, so to create the actual wordlist file, you would need to output the command to a text file.

./kwp basechars/full.base keymaps/en.keymap routes/2-to-10-max-3-direction-changes.route > basickwp.txt

You can then use the resultant text file as a wordlist in Hashcat.

To create a more complex wordlist, use one of the larger route files:

./kwp basechars/full.base keymaps/en.keymap routes/2-to-16-max-3-direction-changes.route > largekwp.txt

hashcat_keymap_walking8

Foreign Language Keywalks

If you need to crack foreign language keywalks, just use one of the foreign language keymap files.  So, to create a Russian keywalk wordlist:

./kwp basechars/full.base keymaps/ru.keymap routes/2-to-16-max-3-direction-changes.route > rukwp.txt

And the resultant file:

hashcat_keymap_walking9

If we have a password hashlist that contains any of the words that were generated, it will crack them. This is shown in the Hashcat result example below:

hashcat_keymap_walking10

Conclusion

In this article we covered how to use the new Hashcat kwp tool to quickly create keymap walking wordlists. We also saw how easy it is to change the keymap language, which can come in handy if you are cracking international passwords. For more information on KWP, check out the Hashcat Github page.

If you are interested in learning more about cracking password with Hashcat, more is on the way in upcoming articles. Also, check out my Basic Security Testing with Kali Linux book that covers a lot of basic password cracking topics, plus a whole lot more!