“Security Testing with Kali NetHunter” Book Overview

nethunter-front-coverMy latest book, “Security Testing with Kali NetHunter” is out! NetHunter brings the power of Kali Linux to supported Android devices.

In this blog post I will cover a quick overview of the book and why I wrote it. This book is the latest in my “Security Testing with Kali” series. If you like my Basic & Intermediate books, I think you will love this one!

I was working on writing a non-Kali based security book, when a good friend approached me and asked if I would create a 50-page quick guide to Kali NetHunter. Being a huge Kali Linux fan, I set my current writing project aside and immediately began on the NetHunter book.

I soon realized that even with trying to make this a quick coverage guide, 50 pages would not even begin to cover the capabilities of this exceptional platform. The ability to use it with wireless and USB based attacks, along with a complement of the normal Kali Linux tools, really makes NetHunter a robust and feature rich device. Add in the fact that it all runs on a small mobile platform and you really have a winner.

To spend the most book time on usage tutorials, with the thought of new devices and platforms at some point being added to the NetHunter supported list, I start the book from the point of a fully installed NetHunter device. Though, I do give an overview of the install process.

This book uses the exact same lab setup as the other books in my Kali series. So, if you already have the lab setup from these books, you just need to connect your NetHunter device to your wireless router.

The book assumes that you already have a level of comfortability with using Kali Linux and have experience connecting to your mobile device using Linux or Windows. From a difficulty level, I would say that this book would fit between my Basic & Intermediate Kali books.

NetHunter includes a couple Android based security tools and a graphical “NetHunter” menu. The book steps you through the Android based attack tools and then goes through each NetHunter menu item as they appear.

Several menu items have an entire chapter devoted to itself.  With the step-by-step tutorials, you can see how the tools work, many times using the tool against our test lab systems.

Along with the NetHunter menu, more experienced users will probably prefer to use many of the Kali tools directly from the terminal prompt. NetHunter uses a slightly reduced install of Kali Linux. You can however install other Kali Metapackages if you wish.

The book topics include:

  • Kali NetHunter Introduction and Overview
  • Shodan App (the “Hacker’s Google”)
  • Using cSploit & DriveDroid
  • Using NetHunter in Human Interface Device Attacks
  • Man-in-the-Middle Attacks
  • Wi-Fi Attacks
  • Metasploit Payload Generator
  • Using NetHunter with a WiFi Pineapple Nano

For the book tutorials, you will need a supported device with NetHunter installed, a host system to run VMWare images, and a supported USB WiFi adapter (I used a TP-Link TL-WN722N).  If you want to follow through the Pineapple Connector chapter you will also need a Hak5 Pineapple Nano.

If you enjoyed my previous books, I think you will really like this one.

Check it out on Amazon.com

 

 

 

 

 

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Book Review: Practical Mobile Forensics

practical mobile forensics“Practical Mobile Forensics” by Satish Bommisetty, Rohit Tamma, and Heather Mahalik is a great book for both the individual looking to learn more about Mobile Forensics and those looking for a good smartphone reference book.

The book covers mobile forensics on Apple iOS, Android, Windows and BlackBerry devices. With the majority of emphasis spent on Apple and Android based product.

In “Practical Mobile Forensics” you will find extensive information on Apple and Android devices including models, features, architecture layout and security.

It covers multiple tools (commercial and open source) to obtain, decrypt, and analyze smartphones including recovering deleted files, contacts, messages and other data.

I am pretty familiar with the Android platform, so the book was a good refresher course on how to connect to and recover data from an Android Device. Though, as I am not as familiar with the iPhone platform, I found the book a great learning tool about Apple mobile devices and how they function and store data.

I did enjoy too that the author not only covered commercial/ law enforcement recovery tools, but also included numerous step-by-step tutorials in performing many of the same functions with open source utilities. The tutorials were easy to follow and the book was full of reference links to find out more information on the tools and technology behind mobile devices.

Though written from a legal forensics/ law enforcement point of view, security individuals will also find this book a good reference guide for mobile devices.

I highly recommend this book.

Available from Packt Publishing and Amazon.com.