Network Reconnaissance with Recon-NG – Basic Usage

I am working on a major update for my first book, “Basic Security Testing with Kali Linux”. Since it was published, the Recon-NG tool has changed a bit. I figured I would post a series of articles on how to use the newer Recon-NG.

The Recon-NG Framework is a powerful tool that allows you to perform automated information gathering and network reconnaissance. Recon-NG automates a lot of the steps that are taken in the initial process of a penetration test. You can automatically hit numerous websites to gather passive information on your target and even actively probe the target itself for data. It has numerous features that allow you to collect user information for social engineering attacks, and network information for network mapping and much more.

Think of it as Metasploit for information collection. Anyone who is familiar with Metasploit will feel right at home as the interface was made to have the same look and feel. The command use and process flow are very similar. Basically you can use Recon-NG to gather info on your target, and then attack it with Metasploit.

Using Recon-NG

You can start Recon-NG by selecting it from the ‘Applications > Information Gathering’ menu, or from the command line:

  • Open a terminal window by clicking on the “Terminal” icon on the quick start bar
  • Type, “recon-ng”:

Basic Recon-ng 1

Type, “help” to bring up a list of commands:

Basic Recon-ng 2

Now type, “show modules” to display a list of available modules:

Basic Recon-ng 3

Modules are used to actually perform the recon process. As you can see there are several different ones available. Go ahead and read down through the module list. Some are passive; they never touch the target network, while some directly probe and can even attack the system you are interested in. If you are familiar with the older version of Recon-NG you will notice that the module names look slightly different. Kali 2 includes the latest version of Recon-NG, and the module name layout has changed from previous versions.

The basic layout is:

Basic Recon-ng 4

1. Module Type: Recon – This is a reconnaissance module.
2. Conversion Action: Domains-hosts – Converts data from “Domains” to “hostnames”.
3. Vehicle used to perform Action: Google _Site_Web – Google is used to perform the search.

So from this module name we can see that it is a recon module that uses Google’s web site search to convert Domain Names to individual Hosts attached to that domain.
When you have found a module that you would like to try the process is fairly straight forward.

  • Type, “use [Modulename]” to use the module
  • Type, “show info” to view information about the module
  • And then, “show options” to see what variables can be set
  • Set the option variables with “set [variable]”
  • Finally, type “run” to execute the module

Stay tuned for additional Recon-NG articles and my re-vamped Basic Kali book. Also, check out my latest book, “Intermediate Security Testing with Kali Linux 2” which contains almost 500 pages packed full of step-by-step tutorials using the latest penetration testing tools!

Crazy Fast Password Recovery with Hashcat

I have been playing with Hashcat a little bit today and I am just stunned on how fast it is. Hashcat is an all purpose password cracker that can run off of your GPU or your CPU. The GPU version, OCLHashcat-plus is touted as the world’s fastest md5crypt, phpass, mscash2 and WPA / WPA2 cracker.

Hashcat is a multi-threaded cracker, so if your CPU can run several threads, it will use them. But the real speed comes into play when using the horsepower of a GPU. If your GPU can run hundreds of threads, all of this power is used to break passwords.

But just how fast is it?

I took just a simple password: “fred” and fed the NTLM password hash into Hashcat. I used just the slower CPU version and the Bruteforce option. The password was recovered as soon as I hit run:

It was so fast, the estimated and elapsed time didn’t even register.

You can also use password dictionaries to use as a guideline for Hashcat. For the next test, I downloaded the “RockYou.txt” password list. This is a list of actual passwords that have been sanitized (usernames removed). I pulled 4 random plain text passwords from RockYou and converted them to Windows NTLM passwords:

elizabeth1 – 6afd63afaebf74211010f02ba62a1b3e
francis123 – 43fccfa6bae3d14b26427c26d00410ef
duodinamico – 27c0555ea55ecfcdba01c022681dda3f
luphu4ever – 9439b142f202437a55f7c52f6fcf82d3

I placed the 4 password hashes into a file called hashes.txt, added in the RockYou plain text password list and fed them into Hashcat:

Hashcat recovered all five passwords in about the same amount of time it took to create the display screen, a second, maybe 2:

Remember that these are the NTLM hashes, not Window’s simpler LM hashes.

Add in the GPU version, advanced rules, attack methods, and Hybrid Masks and you really have a powerful tool to recover almost any password.

New “Live Hacking v1.2” Linux Security Distro Released

Dr. Ali Jahangiri has released a new version of his Live Linux security CD. The original version was a collection of tools that could be used to  test the security of your network.

The new version has added the ever popular Metasploit Framework and also, several IPv6 tools (from website):

The metasploit framework, one of the new tools included with this release, can be used to test your network using the frameworks internal database of known weaknesses and exploits.

Also included in this new release of the Live Hacking CD is the THC-IPV6 tool, a set of tools to attack the inherent protocol weaknesses of IPv6 and ICMP6.

The original “Live Hacking” cd was interesting, kind of like a scaled down version of Backtrack. The added tools will add a lot more capabilities to this distribution. Check it out when you get a chance!

Open Source Intelligence Gathering

We live in a digital world. As we spend more and more time online, a digital footprint is being created about us. Comments on blogs, posts on social network sites, even public records are all searchable with the right tools. Google does a very good job of finding information on the web, but there are programs that dig deeper. They combine all the publicly available information and allow you to follow links through associations. This is called Open Source Intelligence Gathering.

According to wikipedia:

“Open source intelligence (OSINT) is a form of intelligence collection management that involves finding, selecting, and acquiring information from publicly available sources and analyzing it to produce actionable intelligence.”

Some of these programs are just amazing. Maltego, an open source intelligence and forensics program, will blow your socks off. Want to find out information on a person, website, or company? Give Maltego a try. It creates a web of associations from whatever search term you put in. You can use different options, called transforms, to key in on pertinent data. Want to see what social sites are used by a person; there is a transform for that.

Some companies are even using this program to search out what other companies are doing. The Government uses these tools to supplement their proprietary software. Hackers too use these programs when they are gathering information on a target.

Used in the right hands, Open Source Intelligence Gathering programs are an amazing tool. Paterva has made internet data mining very simple and easy to use.