Mac Virus “Backdoor.Flashback” Patch and Removal

Last week, Russian Anti-Virus company Doctor Web, found that the Flashback Mac Trojan has infected almost 600,000 systems. With many of those infected located in the US (see above chart from Dr. Web). The large infection rate has raised some eyebrows, especially since many believe that Macs can not get viruses.

The trojan uses a Java exploit to gain remote access, and possible keylogging capabilities. The malware programmers are targeting three seperate Java vulnerabilities in the attack.

Apple has since patched the vulnerability and according to an Apple security bulletin, the OS X Lion 2012-002 and Java for Mac OS X 10.6 Update 7 can be downloaded and installed via Software Update preferences, or from Apple Downloads.

Doctor Web has created an online tool to check to see if your machine is infected, and security software company F-Secure has released instructions on how to remove the virus if you are indeed infected.

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~ by D. Dieterle on April 9, 2012.

6 Responses to “Mac Virus “Backdoor.Flashback” Patch and Removal”

  1. It’s about time the Mac got a new virus. They are taking all my business :)

    • I hear you, people ask me all the time, “I want a Mac, is it true they don’t get viruses?” Macs get viruses, and yes, so don’t Linux systems (I’ve seen threats bypass Linux AV that the Windows version of the same AV stopped). And as Mac systems become more and more popular, they will be a bigger target for hackers and those with malicious intent.

      • Linux viruses did not even know there was such a thing!

      • Yuppers, a lot of the scripting attacks (Like Java) work against Linux, and software exploits too. A lot of people think they don’t need to update their Firefox because they are running Linux, but a software exploit works against unpatched Linux software just as good as Microsoft.

  2. [...] Trojan exploited three Java vulnerabilities to gain remote access to the infected systems and likely included a keylogger capability to capture authentication [...]

  3. [...] The Trojan exploited three Java vulnerabilities to gain remote access to the infected systems and likely included a keylogger capability to capture authentication [...]

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